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Mexican Threats and Texan Military

afraid that unless we all act united promptly, and forthwith all will be lost."[11]  From New Orleans on June 20, the Texan agent reported a large Mexican force (supposedly some 15,000 men) preparing to advance into Texas at an early date, and stated that he had ordered a number of extra men aboard the Texan public vessels in that port and would despatch them immediately to Texas for orders.[12]  Meanwhile, quite a number of vessels, including a few under Mexican registry, loaded at New Orleans in June and July with provisions and merchandise, and weighed anchor for Matamoros,[13]  which port was opened by a decree of July 16 to the importation of provisions during the war with Texas.[14]  This same decree exempted from seizure mules and wagons carrying supplies within Mexico to the army being fitted out for the Texas campaign. Furthermore, no vessels from Mexican ports had reached New Orleans in some time, a fact which led both New Orleans and Texas observers to conclude that they were being retained at home to transport the large numbers of troops and supplies said to be accumulating on the Mexican seaboard. In consequence, President Burnet proclaimed on July 21 a blockade of the port of Matamoros.[15] 

Lieutenant Colonel Seguin was ordered to evacuate San Antonio and to fall back to army headquarters near Victoria. In preparing to leave Béxar, he appealed to the local inhabitants to drive off the cattle to places where the enemy could not make use of them. Here was an opportunity for the Mexicans of San Antonio to prove their loyalty to the newly established government of Texas. "Fellow citizens: your conduct on this day," warned Seguin, "is going to decide your fate



11. David Ayres to D. G. Burnet, Brazoria, June 18, 1836, in Domestic Correspondence (Texas), 1836-1846, ms.

12. William Bryan to D. C. Burnet, Agency of Texas, New Orleans, June 20, 1836, in Consular Correspondence (Texas), ms.; copy in Executive Department Journals (Texas), Mar. 1836-Sept. 1836, pp. 317-318.

13. Thomas Toby and Brother to David G. Burnet, New Orleans, July 11, 1838 [1836?], in Consular Correspondence (Texas), ms.; copy in Executive Department Journals (Texas), Mar. 1836-Sept. 1836, pp. 340-343 (dated 1838).

14. José Justo Corro, [Decree of the Congreso general, approved by José Justo Corro, President ad interim, July 16, 1836, opening the port of Matamoros to the importation of provisions during the war with Texas, assigning those provisions to the expeditionary force, and exempting from seizure mules and wagons carrying supplies to that army from within the country]. Mexico, Julio 16 de 1836.

15. David G. Burnet, "A Proclamation of Blockade of the Port of Matamoros, Velasco, July 21, 1836," in Telegraph and Texas Register, Aug. 16, 1836.

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AFTER SAN JACINTO: The Texas-Mexican Frontier, 1836-1841
Joseph Milton Nance, 1963